Tag Archives: Fallout 4

What I’m Playing This Week

I’ve played a lot of games over the past week or so (surprise). There was a Steam sale on and though I should be saving for Christmas, I gave myself a small budget to knock a few things off my wishlist.

Here’s what I’ve been playing…

Fallout 4

It’s finally over. It started out well, but eventually turned into a real slog. That happens with all the open world games, really. I may write up a real review of this one soon.

Dead in Bermuda

I started playing this game on a Friday night and basically didn’t stop playing until Saturday night, aside from a few hours of sleep. This game has a “just one more turn” factor, like Civ.  You play as a group of 8 people who have crashed on a desert island. While doing the normal resource management stuff – finding food, crafting, gathering materials – you also explore the island and run into some mysterious beings who mention a prophecy that you can fulfill which will grant you the power to escape the island. The goal is to find out more and fulfill the prophecy before you all die from starvation, injury, sickness, or from throwing yourselves off a cliff. The encounters while you explore the island are quite amusing, and each day ends with a discussion among the characters which may have implications on their physical and mental state.

Dead in Bermuda

The game is really attractive with a nice, clean interface. It’s not overly complex once you get the hang of it, and it does save your progress each day do you don’t necessarily have to start over if everyone dies. A big part of the game is leveling up the characters. There are 16 different skills that all impact some element of the game in some way – people with high gathering skills find more materials, people with high constitution get less fatigued.

There’s not a ton of incentive for replay, as it seems very little of the game is randomized aside from exactly where things are located and a few character interactions. Hawever, I had a lot of fun with it. I recommend it to those of you who are looking for a good survival/resource management game that doesn’t take itself too seriously.

Jade Empire

After all the Bioware talk last month, I felt the need to play the one game from them I’d never tried – Jade Empire. It’s from the same era at Knights of the Old Republic, and it feels very similar. Rather than a user of the Force, you play as a Spirit Monk. Your village gets attacked at the start of the game, your teacher (who seems to be more than he appeared) disappears and you have to go find him to find out the truth about who you are and why you have strange powers.

As expected, the story and interactions with companions are the highlight of the game and there are a lot of interesting sidequests. The combat in the game is quite different than any of Bioware’s other games though. It’s mainly melee combat and each fight is a balance of weak and strong attacks, blocking and dodging. There are multiple different fighting styles and you can switch between them freely. I’m really enjoying this and it’s making me want to replay KOTOR.

Morningstar: Descent to Deadrock

I’m a sucker for an adventure game (or any game) set in space, so picked this one up not too long ago. It’s an okay point and click adventure. Your aim in the game is to repair your ship which has crash landed on a mysterious planet. The story is decent, as are the controls. It does run into the adventure game problem of having a bit too much inventory to deal with – it seems like it could have been reduced for clarity (i.e. do we need both a steel pipe and a steel rod to solve problems?) This resulted in some mindless attempts at combining objects to get past certain puzzles. Also, the voice acting of the main character wasn’t great. Overall it wasn’t bad, but I don’t really recommend this one.

Banished

Banished is a city building strategy game. While I generally like strategy games, this one made me realize how little patience I have for learning complex new games. There are so many features and things to build, it was overwhelming. After spending 20 minutes doing one tutorial and realizing there were 4 or 5 more to go, I decided this probably wasn’t the game for me.

BRoken Sword: Shadow of the Templars

It doesn’t really feel like it, but this point and click adventure game is 20 years old. It follows George, an American lawyer, and Nico, a French journalist as they solve a mystery that involves intrigue, murder, and Templars. I surprised I hadn’t played any of the Broken Sword games earlier, as I love adventure games and I was playing a lot of them when this first game out.

Broken Sword: The Shadow of the TemplarsThe game has it’s good and bad points. The writing is clever and well done, though occasionally too verbose.The puzzles are hit and miss. I had actually started this earlier in the year but quit after the first series of puzzles, which were particularly bad. It started with a sliding block puzzle – not a bad puzzle, sliding blocks are just my personal kryptonite – followed by a ridiculous inventory puzzle that involved using a bullet casing for pretty much everything and a lot of back and forth in order to get into a secret room.

I’m glad I came back to it, as the rest has been pretty good and there have been different puzzle types, like ciphers, which I’m particularly fond of. I think I bought the whole series at one point, and I’ll likely continue on with them when I’ve finished this.

What have you been playing?

Justice Points and Bioware

This weekend I was very excited to be invited onto the Justice Points podcast to take part in Bioware month! My buddy Kaleri was on as well, and we chatted with Apple Cider Mage and Tzufit about all kinds of things – why Bioware games are important to us, best and worst game romances, and what we’re hoping for in Andromeda.

Justice Points logo

Image from justicepoints.com

I also talk a bit about Fallout 4 and Rise of the Tomb Raider in the what I’m playing segment.

I had a ton of fun recording it, and I hope you’ll give it a listen. You can find it on the Justice Points site, or on iTunes or Stitcher.

This was my third appearance on Justice Points, if you want to check out the other episodes they’re all listed on the Pam Speaks page.

Fallout (4 ) Never Changes – First Impressions

I’ve put about 10 hours into Fallout 4 over this weekend. That’s a drop in the bucket compared to the time it will take to complete the game, but I think it’s enough to get a handle on the positives and negatives of this new iteration of Fallout. I’m not writing a full review – I haven’t finished yet, and writing a review of an open world game sounds terrible. However, I do have some assorted  thoughts on the game.

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  1. Character creation. For the first time in Fallout my character isn’t an ugly, blurry mess. Borrowing from DAI’s face sculpting tools, you can actually create a decent looking character in this game.
  2. Setup. For the first time, we get to see what things were like before the bombs fell. It’s brief, but we are introduced to our character and their partner and child just minutes before they’re ushered into a Vault and the nukes go off. It’s nice to have a minute to appreciate Fallout’s distinct aesthetic in its prime before the world becomes a Wasteland.
  3. Story. The game tries to give us a more urgent and personal story from the get-go, but it doesn’t succeed. As we wake up in the Vault we see our infant son get kidnapped, so we go out to find him. However once you leave the vault and get a glimpse of the wasteland, all thoughts of the creepy baby are quickly pushed aside, as exploration is much more appealing. Sure, you can tell people in conversation that you’re looking for your baby, but so far I’ve gone 10 hours without following that particular story thread. There’s no emotional attachment there and frankly it’s just not that interesting.
  4. Urgency. There really isn’t any. At least so far. However, this is a problem with pretty much all open world games, so I won’t hold it too much against Fallout 4.
  5. Voices. For the first time, the protagonist is voiced. This is a very welcome change, though the performance of the female protagonist so far is not particularly inspiring. It’s not bad, but she’s certainly no Commander Shepard. Partially this is due to the writing – the dialogue is sparse and to the point. Though there is usually a sarcastic response option.
  6. Storytelling. Where I’ve always thought the modern Fallout games excel is visual and environmental storytelling. It’s not the big arc, it’s the small ones. It’s stumbling upon a sidequest while you’re on another mission, seeing a skeleton in a car and piecing together what happened, hacking into terminals to find the real story behind a location. Fallout 4 continues to excel at this.
  7. Robots. This game is full of sassy robots, who are full of personality. Not just your companion Cogsworth, there are many robots to meet in the Wasteland.
  8. Combat. VATS is still great, the rest of combat is still kinda shit. Though I’ve been reading in other reviews that the FPS combat has improved, I’m not really seeing it. Especially at the beginning of the game when most enemies rush into melee range, I don’t find the shooting mechanics are very good.
  9. Companions. Companions are quite helpful in combat when it comes to killing things. However, they’re also in the way. Like, all the time. Going down a narrow corridor? There they are, blocking you. Trying to shoot something at a distance? They’ll become an obstacle. If anything, I think this problem may be worse here than in previous games.
  10. Explosions. One of my biggest frustrations in previous Fallout games was that I’d often get blown up in combat, and have no idea where the explosion came from. Though they have added a little icon to tell you when a grenade is near, I still get caught in mystery explosions way more than is necessary.
  11. Saving. You can quicksave your game anywhere, though autosaving doesn’t happen as often as I’d like.
  12. Crafting. Fallout 4 has introduced a rather robust crafting system where you can modify your weapons and armor. It’s an enjoyable addition so far, and it’s nice to customize things to suit your playstyle or visual preferences.
  13. Workshop. Your home in the Wasteland can be built up to our specifications through the Workshop. While initially I didn’t think this was something I’d like, I’ve actually spent quite a bit of time with it. You can build beds, new houses, plant crops, build water pumps – everything a growing Wasteland settlement needs. People you help through the game will join your settlements. It is fun to build, though the game’s engine isn’t ideal for it. Placing objects is awkward. Some kind of overhead or simplified view of things would be great. You can build electric systems to power your base, but it isn’t explained very well. The best part of this is that all the junk you find in the Wasteland – the clipboards, the old telephones – can be used to build things rather than just as vendor fodder.
    One thing I’m not liking as I go through the game is that every place where you help people can be turned into a base, with a workshop for you to build up. While making one wasteland sanctuary sounds fun, making a dozen sounds like a huge timesink. I haven’t figured out what, if anything, happens when you ignore these bases. Does it matter if they don’t have enough food or defence?
  14. Exploration. I’ve been pretty burnt out on open world games lately and I have to say, exploration in Fallout 4 is 100x more enticing than it was in games like Witcher 3 or Dragon Age: Inquisition. Part of this is due to the simplicity of the map. You see icons for major landmarks, but not every single place where you can gather a resource or fight a camp of raiders. So there’s mystery. There’s a reason to explore. It’s not just a matter of ticking off every box on the map. I’m sure there will be many little locations and items that I’ll never find. And that’s okay. The locations I do find are interesting, full of great visuals and stories that don’t need to be explicitly spelled out.
  15. Finding things. At the beginning of the game I found it really hard to locate items. So many games I’ve been playing recently help the player by highlighting objects of interest in some way, and Fallout doesn’t do this. Now that I’m a few hours in, I’ve gotten used to it, and it makes things feel less game-y.
  16. Text. Fallout has some of the best in-game text entries. RPGs are generally full of lore and codex entries, books and letters. I hate reading them. In Fallout most text is found on terminals, and I read every word. Text entries are put in the right places. It’s not just general knowledge or lore, these entries tell you about the places you are in  and the people who live (or have lived) there. They often tell a story from multiple points of view, they can contain hints of where to find item stashes, point you to other interesting locations. Log entries tend to be darkly humorous and the fact that you often have to hack into these terminals to find the information just makes it that much more intriguing. Reading information in Fallout feels like reading someone’s journal, not like reading a textbook.
  17. Overall. Fallout 4 feels like Fallout. The good parts of Fallout 3 are there – the exploration, environment, the storytelling within particular locations, the dark humour. And the bad parts are still there – the combat is mediocre, it doesn’t look as good as other current games, the story doesn’t have any urgency. Though some new mechanics have been added, I don’t find that the existing ones have been improved much. I wouldn’t want a ton to change, but it’s been five years since New Vegas, some refinements would be nice.

If you prefer videos, I’ve also done a mini video review. It covers some of the same stuff, and includes some gameplay footage.

The Best Game Trailers

Fallout 4 was announced today and a teaser trailer was released. The Internet (myself included) is hyped. However, I didn’t find the trailer that great. I’m mostly just excited by the idea of the game. Trailers are just a marketing tool, but some of them are exceptionally well done. Whether or not the game lives up to the trailer is another matter entirely, though. Here are the game trailers I consider the best and most memorable.

Since we’re on the topic, may as well start with this one.

Fallout 3

Back in 2007 there were a lot of rumors of a new Fallout game, but nothing concrete until this trailer was released. I remember seeing it for the first time, thinking “Is this Fallout?! It looks like Fallout. Oh my god, there’s the power armor, it’s Fallout!!!”The Fallout 3 teaser trailer didn’t tell us much, but it confirmed that there would in fact be a game, and it would be set in Washington DC. No gameplay was shown (and considering Bethesda’s ugly game engine, that’s really for the best) but the visuals brought back memories of the original, isometric Fallout games and the pull back shots were used very well to slowly reveal the expanse of the Wasteland. It was set to the haunting melody of the Ink Spots and featured Ron Perlman’s iconic line: War. War never changes. This trailer gave me goosebumps.

Bioshock

This trailer had me hooked from the very first shot. First, it had Bobby Darin (yeah, I like old music). Second, at the 2 second mark, there’s this brilliant frame of a man, underwater and this amazing, illuminated city far beneath him. There’s a brief moment of serenity as we see the art deco design of this underwater world, and then it gets right into the action. Guns, magic, metal monsters, and creepy little girls raised a hundred questions and made me want to know more.

Bioshock Infinite

Yup, more Bioshock. Say what you want about the games, but they sure do make great trailers. By the time the third game rolled around, we knew what they were about. We knew about Rapture, and expected the same dark, underwater world to explore (and shoot the fuck out of). The Infinite trailer came along and gave something completely new. I love the way it teased expectations by having that first underwater view end up being the inside of an aquarium. Instead of Rapture, the trailer showed a gorgeous, bright, city in the sky. Beautiful, but clearly no less dangerous. I also really liked that instead of playing up the power fantasy aspect of the game (which is the direction the TV commercial took), the reveal trailer gave us a view where we were completely helpless.

Dead Island

This one is a tear jerker. Zombie games had a tendency to be more mindless action than emotion (this was released before TWD S1), and this trailer showed us that they could be something else. Could being the important part. From what I’ve heard (I’ve not played it), this trailer has absolutely nothing to do with the actual game. It’s unfortunate that it’s so misleading, but taken on its own this is still a really good cinematic. The way it shows a scene both forwards and in reverse until they come together in the middle is really well done.

Parasite Eve

I remember seeing this way back in 1998 and thinking – this is a video game?! It looks great and has some of the most memorable music of any of the games I’ve played. It features a female protagonist and antagonist. And dinosaur monsters. Final Fantasy got me into RPGs, but this game offered an RPG with more horror and sci-fi elements. I remember getting this game for Christmas. There were people over and I couldn’t play it right away, so instead I kept this opening cinematic looping ALL day.

Witcher 2

I loved first Witcher game, so I was excited when the trailers for Witcher 2 started surfacing. This trailer doesn’t even feature the game’s protagonist, but does give an idea of what the game will be about – killing kings (in case the title didn’t give it away). Really, this is just one of the most impressive cinematics I’ve seen for a game. Though notice how they’ve specifically went out of their way to not have to animate any hair?

World of Warcraft: The Burning Crusade

When I think back to my many years playing WoW, Burning Crusade is the era I look back on most fondly. This expansion was the height of my excitement for the game. I had started playing near the tail end of vanilla, and was just getting into raiding as this came out. This trailer really captured the feel of the Outlands and gave us a big bad to look forward to, who would be looming over our heads until we got to Black Temple. “You are not prepared” is probably the most memorable bit of dialogue from all of WoW and this trailer brings back nothing but fond memories.


How about you? What are some of your favourite game trailers?