Category Archives: WoW

The Best Game Trailers

Fallout 4 was announced today and a teaser trailer was released. The Internet (myself included) is hyped. However, I didn’t find the trailer that great. I’m mostly just excited by the idea of the game. Trailers are just a marketing tool, but some of them are exceptionally well done. Whether or not the game lives up to the trailer is another matter entirely, though. Here are the game trailers I consider the best and most memorable.

Since we’re on the topic, may as well start with this one.

Fallout 3

Back in 2007 there were a lot of rumors of a new Fallout game, but nothing concrete until this trailer was released. I remember seeing it for the first time, thinking “Is this Fallout?! It looks like Fallout. Oh my god, there’s the power armor, it’s Fallout!!!”The Fallout 3 teaser trailer didn’t tell us much, but it confirmed that there would in fact be a game, and it would be set in Washington DC. No gameplay was shown (and considering Bethesda’s ugly game engine, that’s really for the best) but the visuals brought back memories of the original, isometric Fallout games and the pull back shots were used very well to slowly reveal the expanse of the Wasteland. It was set to the haunting melody of the Ink Spots and featured Ron Perlman’s iconic line: War. War never changes. This trailer gave me goosebumps.

Bioshock

This trailer had me hooked from the very first shot. First, it had Bobby Darin (yeah, I like old music). Second, at the 2 second mark, there’s this brilliant frame of a man, underwater and this amazing, illuminated city far beneath him. There’s a brief moment of serenity as we see the art deco design of this underwater world, and then it gets right into the action. Guns, magic, metal monsters, and creepy little girls raised a hundred questions and made me want to know more.

Bioshock Infinite

Yup, more Bioshock. Say what you want about the games, but they sure do make great trailers. By the time the third game rolled around, we knew what they were about. We knew about Rapture, and expected the same dark, underwater world to explore (and shoot the fuck out of). The Infinite trailer came along and gave something completely new. I love the way it teased expectations by having that first underwater view end up being the inside of an aquarium. Instead of Rapture, the trailer showed a gorgeous, bright, city in the sky. Beautiful, but clearly no less dangerous. I also really liked that instead of playing up the power fantasy aspect of the game (which is the direction the TV commercial took), the reveal trailer gave us a view where we were completely helpless.

Dead Island

This one is a tear jerker. Zombie games had a tendency to be more mindless action than emotion (this was released before TWD S1), and this trailer showed us that they could be something else. Could being the important part. From what I’ve heard (I’ve not played it), this trailer has absolutely nothing to do with the actual game. It’s unfortunate that it’s so misleading, but taken on its own this is still a really good cinematic. The way it shows a scene both forwards and in reverse until they come together in the middle is really well done.

Parasite Eve

I remember seeing this way back in 1998 and thinking – this is a video game?! It looks great and has some of the most memorable music of any of the games I’ve played. It features a female protagonist and antagonist. And dinosaur monsters. Final Fantasy got me into RPGs, but this game offered an RPG with more horror and sci-fi elements. I remember getting this game for Christmas. There were people over and I couldn’t play it right away, so instead I kept this opening cinematic looping ALL day.

Witcher 2

I loved first Witcher game, so I was excited when the trailers for Witcher 2 started surfacing. This trailer doesn’t even feature the game’s protagonist, but does give an idea of what the game will be about – killing kings (in case the title didn’t give it away). Really, this is just one of the most impressive cinematics I’ve seen for a game. Though notice how they’ve specifically went out of their way to not have to animate any hair?

World of Warcraft: The Burning Crusade

When I think back to my many years playing WoW, Burning Crusade is the era I look back on most fondly. This expansion was the height of my excitement for the game. I had started playing near the tail end of vanilla, and was just getting into raiding as this came out. This trailer really captured the feel of the Outlands and gave us a big bad to look forward to, who would be looming over our heads until we got to Black Temple. “You are not prepared” is probably the most memorable bit of dialogue from all of WoW and this trailer brings back nothing but fond memories.


How about you? What are some of your favourite game trailers?

Information Overload

Once upon a time, back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth, before the Internet was a big thing, getting help when you were stuck in a game was not easy. The first game I remember getting stuck on was Maniac Mansion. When I got stuck, there wasn’t a lot of help available. Basically I just had to keep trying new things. Sure it was frustrating but, looking back through wistful rose-coloured glasses, it was also kinda nice. I had to figure things out myself.

However, my gaming hobby had barely gotten started before the era of figuring things out yourself started getting eclipsed by the business of game hints. In 1989 Sierra introduced their new hint line – for only $0.75 for the first minute and $0.50 for every additional minute, you could talk to someone who would tell you how to get through their games. I don’t believe I ever called them, but only because I didn’t have a credit card when I was 8. Gaming magazines, like Nintendo Power had sections dedicated to hints and strategies. Prima Games started making strategy guides in 1990, and their guides for challenging games like Myst sold like hotcakes. Hints were on TV too. If you were lucky enough to be a Canadian with access to YTV, Nicholas Picholas would share Turbo Tips with you every week on Video & Arcade Top 10, which premiered in 1991. In 1995 GameFAQs was created, which really got the ball rolling on internet game walkthroughs and guides.

Access to information is great, but when does it become too much? When does it begin to hinder enjoyment of a game rather than enhance it?

Let’s talk about World of Warcraft for a bit. When I first started playing World of Warcraft, one of the coolest things about it was the amount of exploration I could do. Everything was new to me. Every zone had new things to look at, and every quest (whose text I needed to read in order to know where to go) told a new story. There were little surprises, like treasure chests you could find scattered about. Sure, they rarely had anything exciting in them but just finding them and anticipating the contents as you opened them was exciting. Doing dungeons or killing a rare I stumbled upon and having a blue piece of loot for me was unexpected and rewarding. One of my favourite early memories from the game was finding and completing the questline that eventually rewarded me with the Sprite Darter Hatchlings. The quest-giver was quite hidden, so it felt like a secret. Not everyone had one, so it felt special.

If you asked me to name a time something unexpected or surprising happened to me in WoW over the last few expansions, I’d be hard pressed to think of one. What happened? Information overload happened. The Sprite Darter Hatchling questline (if it still existed) could never stay hidden, you’d see a big yellow exclamation point on your map as you came near it. Getting stuck on a quest became near impossible as your map would highlight the area you needed to go. Reading the quest text and actually knowing what was happening in the story became a thing of the past for me, since it was no longer required.

Mods were created that gave you information in-game that you’d otherwise not have access to. With AtlasLoot Enhanced, I could see the loot table of every boss I fought. Good drops were no longer an unexpected delight, because I knew where they all came from. Bad drops became infinitely more disappointing because I knew when they came at the expense of a drop I really wanted. Rare mobs stopped being interesting as soon as I downloaded RareSpawn Overlay so I could see where every one of them spawned and NPC Scan which would blast noise at me as soon as one was in range so I didn’t even need to pay attention to the game. Mists of Pandaria introduced treasures and BoA items you could find around the map. These were fun, until I realized it was much more efficient to check the Wowhead guide and see a map which pinpointed every single one, or download TomTom and be navigated right to them.

Further than just information about objects, there’s also a ton of information available about how to play your character. IcyVeins will tell you how to spec and ability priorities. Mods like SpellFlash will tell you what spell to cast next. Even the default UI will make your spell icons flash when an ability is ready to use. Raid healing was always my favourite thing because it required some decision-making and quick reactions on my part, but even those requirements are reduced by DBM counting down every major ability I need to know about or GTFO screaming when I stand in bad things.

Looking up the information or installing an addon is so much more efficient than trying to figure things out or find things yourself. But it is not more fun. Sure, you could just not use addons, not use Wowhead, but that’s a lot like telling someone who complained about content nerfs to just turn off the Dragon Soul buff. Technically possible, but not bloody likely. Why should you handicap yourself?

For a game with such a huge, beautiful world there’s actually very little to discover in WoW that you can’t find in a database first. Exploration can seem like a waste of time. With PTRs, Betas, and datamining, it’s even possible to learn everything there is to know about a new content patch or expansion – every item, achievement, cinematic, quest – before it’s even released.

Of course, WoW is not the only game that can be ruined by having too much information easily accessible. With all the walkthroughs, FAQs and video guides available, it’s possible to ruin almost any game. Information is good and sometimes a game will really stump me so I’m happy it’s there. However, there’s a thin line between access to info that prevents me from banging my head against a wall for too long, and having so much information available that I never have to actually think for myself.  I played a puzzler called The Bridge a couple of weeks ago and I really enjoyed it. At first. The puzzles were all based on gravity, sometimes momentum, and solving them in the first few levels made me feel accomplished, especially as they got more challenging. But then came a puzzle that I played around with for a good 10 minutes and I couldn’t figure out how to solve it. So I looked up a video, got the solution and went on my way. The next puzzle that stumped me I only tried for a couple of minutes. I mean, I had already found a cool video guide that had all the answers, doesn’t hurt to take another peek, right? By the end of the game I was sitting at my computer, right hand on the keyboard, left hand holding my iPhone as a video walked me through the solutions to all of the last puzzles. This is not fun. This is not gaming. I want to think, want to have to try, but all the answers are right there. Looking up the answers is so fast and easy.

I lack self-control when it comes to spoilers, though the pervasive presence of guides makes me think I’m not the only one. Once I’ve looked up a solution, it becomes very hard not to do it again for that game. Soon I’m not even enjoying the game, I’m just following a set of directions from point A to point B.

When it comes to availability of this information there’s no going back, but it does make me miss the days when finding that information was just a little bit harder and thinking for yourself felt more encouraged.

Role Playing Game

RPGs are one of my favourite genres of video games, but what exactly is a role-playing game?

A role-playing game is a game in which players assume the roles of characters in a fictional setting.

That’s not a very comprehensive description, as it could apply to almost any game. Though I control the character Mario in the fictional setting of the Mushroom Kingdom, I’d never call Super Mario Bros a role-playing game. Ultimately, this whole post is about semantics, but I’m interested in how people define this particular genre and what games the RPG moniker it gets applied to.

The first game that really made me question the meaning of RPG was Borderlands, a game that billed itself as a role-playing shooter. The game had a number of mechanics in common with the more traditional role-playing games such as choice of class, a talent tree, and power increases through gear and gaining stats as you level. But for me, nothing about Borderlands made me feel like I was playing a role. Whether I played as Mordechai the hunter, or Lilith the siren, the game never felt any different beyond basic combat mechanics. A talent tree does not an RPG make.

Talent tree for Mordechai in Borderlands

Character building is a huge part of RPGs, and can fall into one of two categories. The first, which I’ll call mechanical character building, happens by gaining experience through quests or combat, which increases your level, which in turn increases your character’s stats or gives you more abilities. Mechanical character building is what makes you feel like your character is getting more powerful. The second type, which I’ll call narrative character building happens by making decisions that affect your character in different ways. Rather than levelling until you get 18 Strength, you’re making decisions that develop your character’s personality, how other characters react to you, maybe even the game world. Without this second type of character building I’m reluctant to classify a game as an RPG.

Druid talent trees

World of Warcraft is a Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game, but I have honestly never considered that an accurate classification. I know that many people play WoW as an RPG – they create backstories for their characters, give them a personality, and maybe even speak to others in-game in character, but this really comes from their own creativity and imagination. Blizzard developed a lot of lore that people can pull their character stories from, but if you take just the actual game content, there’s really not a lot of character building. As someone who does not RP in-game and is not interested in creating my own stories about my character, my Night Elf Druid is really no different from any of a million other Night Elf Druids. Or Tauren Warriors, for that matter. They don’t talk. They don’t have a personality. They don’t make decisions any deeper than do this quest or don’t do this quest. None of the adventures I have in-game effect the larger world, or the story of the game. We can kill the game’s antagonist on Monday only to have him come back on Tuesday. Choosing to be Resto vs Feral or taking Nature’s Vigil over Heart of the Wild make me feel like I’m developing a stat sheet, not a character. For me, the character building in WoW was 100% mechanical.

Planescape Torment conversation options

Another related, somewhat overlapping component of RPGs is choice and decision-making. You can choose your companions in games like Baldur’s Gate. You can choose to join the Dustmen faction, the Anarchists, or the Sensates (or all of them) in Planescape: Torment. You can choose who will rule the kingdom in Dragon Age. All of these decisions affect the game experience in some way, from making different sidequests available to changing the ending.

FF7 Golden Pagoda

Thinking about RPGs from a decision-making and effect point of view makes me think again about JRPGs. Take Final Fantasy 7 for example. There’s actually very little decision-making in this game. In terms of mechanical character development, you don’t even build your character you really just choose weapons and materia to use. Cloud is Cloud and nothing you do changes his story. You can choose to do certain optional content – recruit Yuffie and Vincent, fight the Weapons, breed chocobos – but again, that doesn’t really impact your character or the narrative. The only part of the game that really provides you with something different based on your decisions is who you go on a date with at the Gold Saucer. Final Fantasy or Shadow Hearts, two series I love, don’t really let me develop a character. The protagonists are written in one way and I’m just along for the ride.

The Walking Dead decisions

So what about games that allow you to make decisions and do a lot of narrative character building, but have no mechanical character building? The Walking Dead is full of choices to make and allows you to shape Lee’s personality, but there is no levelling or gearing up. You don’t get stronger, you just develop the story and cultivate relationships with your companions. Is this an RPG? I personally feel that this kind of decision heavy game provides a much more immersive role-playing experience than something that allows me to adjust 100 different stats, traits, and abilities on a character sheet. But that’s just my opinion.

To me, what makes an RPG is decision-making and character building. Without the ability to have input into the character’s development and choices, I really don’t feel like I’m playing a role. The subgenre of the game – it could be a shooter, or turn-based strategy, or action – doesn’t matter, so much as being able to have an effect on events in the game.

Goodbye Cruel World (of Warcraft)

I’ve been playing World of Warcraft for 8 years. In December, I decided I had played enough. I would have quit then, except I happened to be the GM of my guild and didn’t want to leave them in a lurch or not finish off the final raid tier with them. Now we’ve killed heroic Garrosh a few times, our roster looks pretty solid, and I finally feel like I can stop without feeling like I’m abandoning the guild when they need me. Last night I did my last raid and handed over the GM keys.

Though I can’t say that playing for 6 months longer than I wanted to has left me with the sunniest of dispositions in regards to the game, I’m not going to bash WoW or blame Blizzard, complain about changes that have driven me away. The title of this post is just something I couldn’t resist the drama of. The game is fine, when it’s what you’re into. Raid encounters in Mists were good for the most part. Challenge modes were great. The expansion gave players a ton of new stuff to do. I’m also not going to complain about changes that are upcoming. The changes to healing sound great and much-needed, and the ability pruning hunters are getting is also a good thing. I’m not crazy about the all orc dudes all the time direction the developers seem set on continuing, but I’ve also never cared about the story in this game, so it’s not really something I can complain about.

The only grudge I hold is for the complete lack of action that has taken place to remedy the problem of having content rushed at the beginning of an xpac then leaving the last tier to fester for far too long. After 6 years and three expansions, you’d think some kind of learning would happen.

It’s not the game, it’s me. Priorities have changed. When deciding between playing a game I can finish vs. one that never ends, I’d rather pick the one I can play, enjoy, complete, then put down. I’d rather read a book, take my dog for a walk, or spend time with my boyfriend. Games should be an escape, but this one turned into an anchor.

Never say never I guess, but at this point I have no plans to purchase the expansion, or keep my account active any longer than I’ve got it paid up for. I’m pretty sure it would be impossible for me to be casually interested in WoW or play without raiding. I think the MMO chapter of my gaming life is over. I’ll miss everyone in Apotheosis, all the good times I’ve had in raids, dungeons, and RBGs with people I really enjoy playing with. Luckily most of the people who kept me playing this game over the few last years are either close by or just 140 characters away on Twitter.

I’ll miss blogging about it. Sometimes talking about the game could be even more enjoyable than playing the game. Cannot be Tamed is not going anywhere, but I don’t expect to have much to say much about WoW anymore. I have been really into talking about other games and gaming topics lately though, so I’m going to continue on with that. I’d love if you stuck around to talk to me about other games, but I’ll understand if you mostly came here for WoW info.

So thanks for all the good times, WoW. It’s been quite the ride.

Monkey on my Back

I haven’t done a /played in a while. I don’t really want to see the number of days it would show me. I know I’ve spent over a year of my life in Azeroth though. I’ve been thinking about how this game manages to gets its hooks in so deep for so long.

Collection

People love things. And WoW has so many (pixelated) things to collect. There’s gear, gold, companion/battle pets, mounts, vanity items, toys, tabards, profession recipes. Though some things aren’t even part of a collection per-say, those of us with hoarding tendencies can even make endless loops around zones to farm stockpiles of ore or herbs. Not everyone will want to collect everything (I hate vanity items and delete them from my bags immediately), but there’s something for everyone. I don’t even like pet battles but I still went around and collected every pet in Azeroth at one point. As long as there is some new object to collect, even if you have to kill something 700 times before lady luck smiles upon you and it drops, people will log in.

Completion

This one goes along with Collection, and is the one that usually got me. Achievements. For the collectors, possessing those 90 battle pets found in Eastern Kingdoms was the reward. For me, it was those five (5!! /cry) achievement points I got when I caught the last one. I didn’t give a shit about the pets themselves, and I certainly didn’t have fun for 90% of the time I spent collecting them. But those shiny, arbitrary points – I wanted them all. Of course achievements aren’t unique to WoW, or MMOs. If a game has a multi-platform release, I’ll always get it for Xbox because I love those gamer points (and the Xbox controller). The difference is, going for all the achievements in your average Xbox game will only take a couple extra hours. In WoW, the time investment needed can be absolutely ridiculous. And it needs to be, or else you’d get them all and have nothing to log in for. At one point I wanted to go for Battlemaster. Then I realized that would likely be at least a hundred hours of generally frustrating gameplay (that number is a total guess and probably a very conservative one). I spent hours going for archaeology achievements, an activity which was about as interesting as watching paint dry (and with paint, at least there are fumes).The pinnacle of ludicrousness came recently, with Going to Need a Bigger Bag. We haven’t had new content in 9 months, but people are still logging in to camp mobs, kill mobs, hate life when the last item they need doesn’t drop, and then do it all over again.

Competition

I like to raid, I like to do it well, and I want to kill things before most people. How could I ever unsub while there’s still that last big bad to kill? Of course, the raid competition bug bites many people a lot harder than me. I like to kill bosses, but I also like my 9 hour per week raid schedule. For those who are truly competitive, they not only log upwards of 12, 15, 20, hours per week raiding, they also do all the current raiding extras – rep grinds, valor capping, food farming, and consumable crafting. The truly competitive even go so far as to level and gear up alts so they can run content multiple times, funnel gear to raider mains, etc. It’s not enough to just see the content, you need to see it and defeat it first, and with that comes a lot of time commitment.

Community

In a multi-player game, this one is the biggie. If I can take a step back, the collection, completion, and competition aspects that have kept me playing this game for 8 years seems rather inane. When the servers shut down and Jasyla the Night Elf Druid is no more, will I care that I had 173 mounts, 19460 achievement points, or that my guild was the 176th US 25man guild to defeat Heroic Iron Qon? Not likely. But I will care about all the friends I met in-game, the friendships that extended into real life, and the people I haven’t met but chat with often on Twitter or blog comments. I’ve seen a number of people over the past week or so really struggling with wanting to step away from WoW over some things that have been said by executives recently, and not wanting to leave their friends, the community of people they’ve become a part of. I’m sure that obligation is a thing that keeps a lot of people playing over the years. Wanting to avoid additional obligation is the thing that’s kept me from ever picking up another MMO habit. When I don’t enjoy playing the newest Final Fantasy game, I just stop – return it to the store if I’m feeling ambitious. No harm, no foul. But when WoW gets boring, when the healing game sucks, boss fights require spreadsheets, and we don’t see any new content for a year? Stopping isn’t so easy since it means losing a big source of connection to the community.

Conclusion

There is no conclusion. It doesn’t end, you never win. The story doesn’t get wrapped up. So you’ve killed heroic Garrosh? Just wait for a bit and there will be a whole new set of bads to kill (also, you didn’t really kill him, sucker, he’ll be back because we can never get enough orc bros). There will always be another quest zone, a new PVP season, a new raid instance. You may feel a sense of accomplishment now, but it will fade as soon as the next thing is released, and you’ll have something new you need to conquer.

So, I guess that’s how it happens. One day a friend says “hey, you should try this, I think you’d like it”. The next thing you know, its 8 years later, you’re still playing, you’ve spent $1500 on subscription fees, and dedicated 10,000 hours of your life to a single game but still can’t say that you’ve beat it.

WoW Stories – Echelon

Last night my boyfriend and I were talking about our WoW histories. This story of mine came up, and it’s one of my most memorable moments in WoW, so I thought I’d share it.


 Once upon a time, many years ago, I was in a guild called Echelon. It was a guild I founded with some friends I had made in my previous guild, Group 5. Group 5 was a guild a bunch of us has joined just before The Burning Crusade came out. Group Five wasn’t terribly progressed, we had cleared Molten Core and AQ 20, and were just getting started in BWL. After being in Group 5 for a little while, a few of us decided it was not the place we wanted to be. Part of the problem was the transition from a 40-man raid to a number of 10-mans that were raiding Kara. The teams were formed in a questionable way and there was tension and competition (but not the good kind) between the teams of the long time Group 5 members and the people who had joined the guild more recently. 

After a while, things came to a boil and myself and two others decided to form our own guild – Echelon. We raided Kara some and got ourselves built up to a 25 fairly quickly so we could start working on the other raids. Things went okay. We weren’t the best raid guild, but we killed some bosses.

One night we were working on Gruul. It wasn’t going so well. Another resto Druid was getting exceedingly agitated that we were wiping and decided to rage quit. He left the raid, gquit his Druid, then methodically logged onto and gquit all of this other toons. Except he found he couldn’t quit the guild on his last alt. Whenever he typed /gquit he got a message saying that he could not quit the guild, because he was the guildmaster. Now this was odd. Our actual guild master was displaying correctly in the guild roster, this toon was just someone’s level 29 alt. But somehow, the game thought he was the GM. After unsuccessfully trying to quit a few times, he solved his problem with /gdisband. All of a sudden, in the middle of a raid, we were all guildless.

Obviously this was a bit of a shock, but rather than let it disrupt things too much, the raid kept going.

After raid, our GM went to Ironforge to re-create the guild, only to be met with the message that the name Echelon was already in use. One of the (many) Bleeding Hollow trolls had registered our guild name while we were finishing our raid. A bunch of them were even bragging about it in trade chat. Tickets were opened, but we weren’t able to get our guild name back, so from then on we were Echelon with a stupid special character on one of the Es.

The guild didn’t last too long. I left for the greener pastures of aus on Proudmoore near the end of tier 5 and forever left Bleeding Hollow behind. This event made my Echelon experience unforgettable though.


I even found a copy of the GM’s forum post about this.

Lessons learned from this?

People are dicks. 

Guild breaking bugs suck.

As far as we could gather based on bug reports and such on the official forums, our GM doing large amounts of guild rank changes in a short time span broke something. A few people who didn’t hold the GM rank within guild ended up with guild master powers.

It was awful when this happened, but years later I look back and find this kinda funny.

MoP – The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

I know we’ve likely still got 6 months to go before Warlords of Draenor is released and Mists of Pandaria is officially over, but honestly, the end feels overdue already. I thought this would be a good time to look back at the expansion and think about what aspects were great and which ones were not so good.

The Good

1. Pandaria is beautiful. The zones are varied and interesting. From the wildlife to the landscapes, everything looked good. The final cut scene in Jade Forest took my breath away the first time I saw it, and opening up the gates to the gorgeous Vale of Eternal Blossoms for the first time was one of my favourite moments from any expansion.

2. Challenge modes. I loved doing challenge modes the first time around. Small group content that was actually challenging? Amazing. These were a whole lot of fun. I will say though, I found they lost their luster a bit after I got  my first set of golds. Maybe it was because healing them on my Druid was more challenging than dpsing on my Hunter. Maybe because by the time I got around to them on my Hunter the people I was running with had already done them so many times, and there were countless CM guides and videos out so the problem-solving aspect was gone. Either way, when these became less challenging, I found them less rewarding. But they were amazing the first time around.

3. Different types of solo content. MoP added a lot of things that people
could do to occupy themselves. Proving grounds were a nice challenge, the individual parts of the legendary quest line were unique, pet battles (more the collection aspect really) gave me a lot to do, even farms provided me with something to do for a little while. There was also Brawler’s Guild, rare hunting, and many treasures to find.

4. Raid content, for the most part, was good. There were a lot of different,  interesting bosses. The devs played with some new mechanics and gimmicks (some successful, some not). I found tier to be 14 the strongest raid tier (even though it didn’t last long enough), buts tiers 15 and 16 had their shining spots as well.

The Bad

1. The grind. MoP had a lot of grindy components – dailies, rep, valor, coins, lesser charms. That kind of thing is never really enjoyable. However, I’m putting this in the ‘bad’ category instead of ‘ugly’ because it wasn’t that huge a deal. I know many raiders claim they were forced to do everything all the time, but I’m not one of them. I didn’t want to do Golden Lotus dailies when MoP launched, so I didn’t. I lived. My raid killed bosses. Besides, by the time you farmed the rep and the valor to get that revered for that chest or ring you wanted, one would drop for you in raid the very next day – that’s how it works.

2. Legendary Cloaks. How do you make a legendary item feel anything but legendary? Give it to everyone. Then give it to all of their alts. Besides feeling completely unspecial, making the legendary so ubiquitous also meant that if you wanted to raid occasionally on an alt (especially as a dps) you basically needed the legendary to be at all viable. If you didn’t want to grind through item collection, rep and valor, you pretty much had to resign yourself to the fact that your output would suck. I did find that 90% of the legendary questline was enjoyable – but only once.

3. All the things that made guild/raid administration so much harder than it needed to be.

  • Some raid encounters (heroic Ji-Kun, Dark Animus, Spoils of Pandaria) required spreadsheets in order to organize everyone. It went so far beyond “assign x healer to use a cooldown, y dps to interrupt this mob, and group z to stand here” it was ridiculous. The 9 different mobs in the Paragons of the Klaxxi encounter have a total of roughly 40 different abilities. I killed those guys a dozen times on normal and never actually understood what was going on.
  • Things like Thunderforged/Warforged gear and the ability for raiders to coin loot made loot systems more difficult to deal with.
  • Six different ilvls of loot in a tier and four different raid difficulties.
  • Raid comp requirements varied wildly from fight to fight. Some fights heavily favoured comps with lots of rogues and hunters, some were better with many warlocks (most of them, really). Heroic Thok required 8 healers. Garrosh – 3 or 4. What are those other 5 healers supposed to do? 
  • All of the raid meta achievements that had multiple requirements (like Megaera, Lei Shen, Dark Animus trash) made getting people their metas in raid complicated and repetitive. I didn’t even get mine in ToT, and I’m the GM who rarely missed a raid 🙁

The Ugly

1. Spending a year in the last tier of content. I know, I’m a broken record on this, but it’s awful piled on top of more awful because it’s the 3rd time it’s happened. People are bored and it’s a problem.

2. Healing became a game of cooldowns and button mashing. During the first tier of the expansion, healing was interesting. Mana mattered, I used most of the spells in my spellbook. As time went on this changed and healing turned into spam all the AoE/smart heals all the time. Very dull. Healing was also made less interesting my the amount of non-healer raid cooldowns available. With 3 offpsec HTTs, a few DAs, a boomkin to Tranq and a Warrior or two to do all the things they do, the way to defeat harder encounters usually involved dropping healers. I thought I’d be a healer forever, but the progression of healing in MoP managed to drive me into a dps role.

3. Lag and disconnects. There were a few things in the game that caused some awful lag, especially in 25s. Things like smart heals and Stampede were blamed, though they apparently got fixed. Lag stuck my raid most fiercely on Lei Shen and Siegecrafter, and we lost more than a few raid nights to it, as the game was basically unplayable for some people. It’s one thing to not kill a boss because people couldn’t perform adequately, it’s another to not kill it because half your raid has so much lag they can’t move out of spell effects fast enough.


 

Those are the highs and lows that stand out for me in MoP. What parts of the expansion did you love or hate?